Tips for Deducting Losses From a Disaster, Fire or Theft — Boris Benic CPA

March 29, 2016 If you suffer damage to your home or personal property, you may be able to deduct these “casualty” losses on your federal income tax return. A casualty is a sudden, unexpected or unusual event, such as a natural disaster (hurricane, tornado, flood, earthquake, etc.), fire, accident, theft or vandalism. A casualty loss […]

via Tips for Deducting Losses From a Disaster, Fire or Theft — Boris Benic CPA

Victim of a disaster, fire or theft? You may be eligible for a tax deduction — McFadyen & Sumner’s ON THE MONEY

If you suffer damage to your home or personal property, you may be able to deduct these “casualty” losses on your federal income tax return. A casualty is a sudden, unexpected or unusual event, such as a natural disaster (hurricane, tornado, flood, earthquake, etc.), fire, accident, theft or vandalism. A casualty loss doesn’t include […]

via Victim of a disaster, fire or theft? You may be eligible for a tax deduction — McFadyen & Sumner’s ON THE MONEY

Water Damage Restoration

When you need help with water damage (or fire, smoke or mold mitigation) the number one service provider we’ve used on numerous occasions is – SERVPRO.

This team of experts gets the job done right, limiting the extent of the damages “Like it never even happened.” They arrived quickly, knew what to do, and decreased our stress load as a result of it. If a house lift is not in your future, but flooding is – keep this company in mind.

If in metro New York, call (800) 967 – 6663. Tell them Robin sent you.

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National number: 1 – 800 – SERVPRO

Houzz Completion

ALL GOOD THINGS MUST COME TO AN END – Fortunately, so do house renovation projects.

Just over a year ago this blog was initiated as a means to document our house elevation for flood mitigation project. It was also designed to assist anyone with similar flooding woes with some options and an accurate portrayal of all that is involved in an undertaking of this magnitude.

“Whatever good things we build end up building us.”

Jim Rhone

What makes this project – with its headaches, expenses, approvals from city, country and state officials, and occasional grief from some neighbors all worth it? When those big storms have come to town, we’ve been able to sleep and maintain only a casual interest in how much rain was falling.

Our era of flooding, repairing a damaged home and rebuilding again is over. Now that this project is complete, I’m off to another topic. I will be updating this site on a very limited basis. Thank you to everyone who took the time to explore this blog.

Robin

FloodSavvy.com

New Landscape for a Lifted House

FINAL STEPS TO COMPLETION: The house project finally completed, the only thing left to do is fill in the landscape.

As the former landscape was completely destroyed during the process, we were starting with a clean slate. The front yard just after our house elevation project –

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Front yard prior to landscape

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AFTER: A few trips to some local nursery’s, viewing of other lifted homes, and a bit of research on the web and we made our decisions. Sod was an easy call as it goes in so fast and we only needed to cover a small area.

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New sod being rolled into place

THE VERY NEXT DAY: A storm whipped into town dropping a lot of rainfall. At first it was welcomed as a huge boost to our new sod, which needs to be watered – a lot – in the first few weeks. Mother nature came at just the right time. But the rain continued. It rained and rained. Flood warnings were issued. We sat snug in our newly lifted house. But our new sod did not fair so well …

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The sod was strew about due to minor flooding

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The high water mark …

The homes across the street suffered minor basement flooding, but the water never reached our house, just the front yard.

SUN SHINES AGAIN: 

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A few moths later and our yard was complete

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In the photo above note how the red maple plays off the red hue of the rocks; it’s height helps to  off-set the tall foundation. A cypress was added to the planting bed in the stair design to provide year round interest.