Category Archives: WEATHER

flood savvy.com

Flash Floods versus Tornadoes

Flash Floods

A flash flood is a sudden local flood, that happens in low lying areas. The main cause’s of flash floods are heavy rain, and excessive snow melt. Out of all the different types of flooding, flash floods are considered the most dangerous because they they can occur just after 5 minutes of heavy rainfall. The flash flood water often moves at high speeds and can carry debris as big as trees or cars down the road. Although you may not hear about flash floods very often, there are hundreds a year in the United States alone every year.

Over the last 30 years, on average 86 people die in flash floods a year. Additionally, these floods also push around 75,000 Americans out of their homes each year. The best advice for how to make it out of a flash flood is to try and get to high ground, and try and avoid the flood water.

Flash floods are the most dangerous kind of floods, because they combine the destructive power of a flood with incredible speed. Flash floods occur when heavy rainfall exceeds the ability of the ground to absorb it. 

The National Severe Storms Laboratory
NOAA

Tornadoes

Tornado Safety

Tornadoes are a natural disaster that occurs when warm humid air collides with dry, cold air. Tornados can travel at speeds between 65 and 200 MPH. Each year there are around 1000 tornados in America, killing an average of 71 people a year in America.

Although tornados happen almost everywhere in the world, the most frequent place is America, more specifically tornado ally. Tornado ally is the nick name for the area of the central US between the Appalachian mountains and the Rocky mountains where the most frequent strong tornados occur.

However, the idea of a “tornado alley” can be misleading. The U.S. tornado threat shifts from the Southeast in the cooler months of the year, toward the southern and central Plains in May and June, and the northern Plains and Midwest during early summer. Tornadoes can occur and have been reported in all fifty states!

The National Severe Storm Laboratory

If you ever find yourself stuck in a tornado, the best thing to do is try and go underground, such as a basement. This should protect you from the tornado. One thing you should make sure to avoid is being close to windows since there is a good chance they will get blown out by the tornado and you could get cut from the glass.

NOAA

FloodSavvy

Maria Downgraded to a Tropical Storm

Hurricane MARIA: Hurricane Maria has finally pushed out to sea and good riddance. The Hurricane carved a path of destruction in its wake that will take years to unravel. Prior to completely bidding a farewell, tropical storm force winds  will be disturbing the coast so an advisory remains in effect.

Hurricane LEE: Earlier this morning Hurricane Lee was upgraded to Hurricane status making it the fifth major hurricane in the Atlantic for 2017. This category 3 storm is not expected to make landfall on the eastern seaboard. Yesterday Hurricane Lee was east-southeast about 485 miles off the coast of Bermuda. It is expected to continue to push north east and on out over the Atlantic Ocean.

Tracking Hurricane Maria

Hurricane Maria has been officially downgraded to Tropical Storm Maria as it is set of move offshore of the eastern United States. This is the probable path the storm will follow. Caution is advised for anyone on or near the coastline as high sea surges and strong rip tides may be in play.

Storm Definitions according to the National Hurricane Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA): 

D: Tropical Depression – wind speed less than 39 MPH
S: Tropical Storm – wind speed between 39 MPH and 73 MPH
H: Hurricane – wind speed between 74 MPH and 110 MPH
M: Major Hurricane – wind speed greater than 110 MPH

 

Puerto Rico After the Hurricanes: How You Can Help

Flood Savvy.com

Hurricane Maria had a direct hit on Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017

Puerto Rico: The Caribbean Island, home to nearly 3.4 million Americans, is facing near total destruction following last week’s mind-bending Hurricane Maria. Many are filled with empathy for the citizens of Puerto Rico, but are not sure how they can help.

Below is a list of organizations working tirelessly to help support, rebuild, and supply the bare necessities.

CASH IS KING:

Many organizations are looking for cold hard cash. This gives them the opportunity to get and give exactly what is needed.

United For Puerto Rico 

UNICEF

All Hands Volunteers

Americares

Save the Children

One America Appeal This charity is spearheaded by numerous former USA Presidents

SUPPLIES:

From bottled water to diapers to building supplies, there is almost nothing Puerto Rico does not need right now. The National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD) is coordinating many of these donations here (and corporate giving here).

VOLUNTEERS: 

It’s a little too soon for volunteers on the ground to assist with recovery as the airport is working on a a very limited schedule and the infrastructure on the island is not prepared to handle, house, or meet any of the needs a volunteer would need. But soon …

Check back with VOAD for more details as they become available.

As always, it is a good idea to do a little of your own research to determine which charity is the right one for you. A good place to look is Charity Navigator.

 

 

Puerto Rico Receives Help from NYC First Responders After Hurricane Maria

On Wednesday, September 20, 2018, Hurricane Maria slammed into the island of Puerto Rico. This was the strongest hurricane to strike the island in over 80 years. Hurricane Maria left near apocalyptic conditions  in its wake: toppled power lines, extensive flooding, and utter devastation to so many homes and structures. Even basic necessities such as fresh water, fuel and phone service have been interrupted, resulting in a growing humanitarian crisis.

Help on the Way:  According to NBC 4 New York, First Responders from New York City flew down to Puerto Rico this past Saturday, September 23. Their goal is to assist the island’s overwhelmed emergency management center. This will no doubt be a protracted clean-up effort as Puerto Rico works to rebuild.

“This is total devastation. Puerto Rico, in terms of the infrastructure, will not be the same. … This is something of historic proportions.”

Carlos Mercader, spokesman for Puerto Rico’s governor

Evacuating due to flooding in Puerto Rico post Hurricane Maria.
Credit: Jose Rodrigo Madera for CNN